Genetic Report

We help people get to the root cause when it comes to diet and environmental factors that impact DNA and show clients the pathways that may be compromised . Through the use of the Genetic Report it may be possible to manipulate compromised genetics with nutrition and supplementation.

Our reports are some of the most comprehensive and accurate available, containing sections on Eye health, Detox, Tongue tie/cleft palate, Methylation, Allergies, Mold, IgE, IgA, IgG, Clotting disorders, Thyroid, Celiac/Gluten intolerance, and more…

Science behind the report


Our Genetic Report identifies single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs that may influence health and risk for diseases. This includes includes a variety of Methylation Pathway SNPs known to influence many aspects of health including those for:

  • Insulin Sensitivity
  • Bone Health
  • Cancer Risks
  • Cardiovascular Health
  • Detoxification Processes
  • Fertility
  • Mitochondrial Function and Metabolism
  • Methylation
  • Neurotransmitter Balance

What is Methylation?

Methylation is a chemical process that happens billions of times per second in every cell of the body. Methyl groups are transferred and donated between many different molecules which change their structure and function. Methyl groups act like billions of switches which turn genes on or off, help regulate mood, detoxify hormones, produce energy, and promote healthy aging.

Vitamins, minerals, and amino acids from the diet are needed to keep this process running smoothly. There are also genetic factors and oxidative stressors which can affect how well this pathway works.

Why is Methylation important?

Methylation is needed to create DNA and RNA and regulate gene expression. It helps make creatine, which is needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Methylation is involved in basic energy production, fat metabolism, immune responses, vascular health, and cell membrane repair. It produces and metabolizes neurotransmitters to regulate mood. Methylation also works to neutralize toxins and hormones.

Methylation defects have been associated with many clinical conditions including, but not limited to cancer, autism, ADHD, congenital and neural tube defects, cognitive decline, depression, cardiovascular disease, and schizophrenia

Here's how it works:


1.) Purchase

Purchase your RCA Nutrition Genetic Report here.

2.) Order/Send your 23andme DNA Test

a.) If you already have completed a 23andme genetic DNA test you can email us the results.
b) If you have not completed a 23andMe DNA test you can order 1 Ancestry + Traits test kit
here.

3.) Fill out the client information packet

Your genes are the foundation to understanding your health and the roadmap to better nutrition. Other factors that are crucial to give you the best results include your current nutrition, your environmental factors, and your medical history. Our information packet is the companion to your gene reporting offering us a better picture of your overall situation and health.

4.) Send us your completed information packet and the raw genetic data file

In 2-3 weeks once you have received your 23andMe test results, or if you already have a 23andMe DNA test completed with results, you can download your raw data by following the instructions here.

5.) Receive your Personalized Report

Once we have completed generating your report we will go over the results with you along with recommendations.

More than 50% of people are affected by genetic variants in the methylation pathway.

Methylation can play an important role in many chronic diseases. By understanding your genetics you can prevent and address these conditions with the right nutrition.

Who may benefit from this test?

Individuals with any of the following diagnoses or symptoms:

  • Cardiovascular Diseases e.g. hypertension, coronary artery disease, stroke 4-10
  •  Neurological Disorders e.g. depression, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, ADD/ADHD, ASD, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine, insomnia 7, 10-17
  • Metabolic Conditions e.g. metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, kidney diseases, reduced ability to metabolize medications, multiple chemical sensitivity 10, 18-21
  • Musculoskeletal Disorders e.g. osteoporosis 10, 22
  • Eye Diseases e.g. macular degeneration 23, 24
  • Cancer e.g. colorectal, breast, and others 1, 10, 25

  • Test Components

    1. ACE

    This gene encodes an enzyme involved in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte balance. It catalyzes the conversion of angiotensin I into a physiologically active peptide angiotensin II. Angiotensin II is a potent vasopressor and aldosterone-stimulating peptide that controls blood pressure and fluid-electrolyte balance. This angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) also inactivates the vasodilator protein, bradykinin. Accordingly, the encoded enzyme increases blood pressure and is a drug target of ACE inhibitors, which are often prescribed to reduce blood pressure. This enzyme additionally plays a role in fertility through its ability to cleave and release GPI-anchored membrane proteins in spermatozoa. Many studies have associated the presence or absence of a 287 bp Alu repeat element in this gene with the levels of circulating enzyme. This polymorphism, as well as mutations in this gene, have been implicated in a wide variety of diseases including cardiovascular pathophysiologies, psoriasis, renal disease, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease.

    2. ALDH


    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that is known for its important role in oxidation and detoxification of Alcohol.

    3. BHMT

    This gene encodes a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of betaine and homocysteine to dimethylglycine and methionine, respectively. Defects in this gene could lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia

    4. CBS

    The protein encoded by this gene acts as a homotetramer to catalyze the conversion of homocysteine to cystathionine, the first step in the transsulfuration pathway. The encoded protein is allosterically activated by adenosyl-methionine and uses pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor. Defects in this gene can cause cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency (CBSD), which can lead to homocystinuria. This gene is a major contributor to cellular hydrogen sulfide production.

    5. COMT

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to catecholamines, including the neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. This O-methylation results in one of the major degradative pathways of the catecholamine transmitters. In addition to its role in the metabolism of endogenous substances, COMT is important in the metabolism of catechol drugs used in the treatment of hypertension, asthma, and Parkinson disease. COMT is found in two forms in tissues, a soluble form (S-COMT) and a membrane-bound form (MB-COMT).

    11. GSR

    This gene encodes a member of the class-I pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase family. This enzyme is a homodimeric flavoprotein. It is a central enzyme of cellular antioxidant defense, and reduces oxidized glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to the sulfhydryl form GSH, which is an important cellular antioxidant. Rare mutations in this gene result in hereditary glutathione reductase deficiency.

    12. GSTM

    Cytosolic and membrane-bound forms of glutathione S-transferase are encoded by two distinct supergene families. At present, eight distinct classes of the soluble cytoplasmic mammalian glutathione S-transferases have been identified: alpha, kappa, mu, omega, pi, sigma, theta and zeta. This gene encodes a glutathione S-transferase that belongs to the mu class. The mu class of enzymes functions in the detoxification of electrophilic compounds, including carcinogens, therapeutic drugs, environmental toxins and products of oxidative stress, by conjugation with glutathione. The genes encoding the mu class of enzymes are organized in a gene cluster on chromosome 1p13.3 and are known to be highly polymorphic. These genetic variations can change an individual's susceptibility to carcinogens and toxins as well as affect the toxicity and efficacy of certain drugs.

    13. HFE

    The protein encoded by this gene is a membrane protein that is similar to MHC class I-type proteins and associates with beta2-microglobulin (beta2M). It is thought that this protein functions to regulate iron absorption by regulating the interaction of the transferrin receptor with transferrin. The iron storage disorder, hereditary haemochromatosis, is a recessive genetic disorder that results from defects in this gene.

    14. HNMT

    This gene encodes the first enzyme which is found in the cytosol and uses S-adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor. In the mammalian brain, the neurotransmitter activity of histamine is controlled by N(tau)-methylation as diamine oxidase is not found in the central nervous system. A common genetic polymorphism affects the activity levels of this gene product in red blood cells.

    15. MAOB

    The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the flavin monoamine oxidase family. It is a enzyme located in the mitochondrial outer membrane. It catalyzes the oxidative deamination of biogenic and xenobiotic amines and plays an important role in the metabolism of neuroactive and vasoactive amines in the central nervous sysytem and peripheral tissues.

    21. NOS

    The protein encoded by this gene belongs to the family of nitric oxide synthases, which synthesize nitric oxide from L-arginine. Nitric oxide is a reactive free radical, which acts as a biologic mediator in several processes, including neurotransmission, and antimicrobial and antitumoral activities. In the brain and peripheral nervous system, nitric oxide displays many properties of a neurotransmitter, and has been implicated in neurotoxicity associated with stroke and neurodegenerative diseases, neural regulation of smooth muscle, including peristalsis, and penile erection.

    22. PEMT

    PEMT (Phosphatidylethanolamine N-Methyltransferase) is a Protein Coding gene. Diseases associated with PEMT include Choline Deficiency Disease and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    23. PNMT

    The product of this gene catalyzes the last step of the catecholamine biosynthesis pathway, which methylates norepinephrine to form epinephrine (adrenaline). The enzyme also has beta-carboline 2N-methyltransferase activity. This gene is thought to play a key step in regulating epinephrine production.

    24. SLC

    The human solute carrier (SLC) superfamily of transporters is comprised of over 400 membrane-bound proteins, and plays essential roles in a multitude of physiological and pharmacological processes.

    25. SOD

    This gene encodes a member of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein family. SODs are antioxidant enzymes that catalyze the conversion of superoxide radicals into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen, which may protect the brain, lungs, and other tissues from oxidative stress.

    6. CYP1A2

    This gene encodes a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes. The cytochrome P450 proteins are monooxygenases which catalyze many reactions involved in drug metabolism and synthesis of cholesterol, steroids and other lipids. The protein encoded by this gene localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and its expression is induced by some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are found in cigarette smoke.

    7. DHFR

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzes the reduction of dihydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate (THF). THF is needed for the action of folate-dependent enzymes and is thus essential for DNA synthesis and methylation.

    8. DHFR

    Dihydrofolate reductase converts dihydrofolate into tetrahydrofolate, a methyl group shuttle required for the de novo synthesis of purines, thymidylic acid, and certain amino acids.  Dihydrofolate reductase deficiency has been linked to megaloblastic anemia.

    9. FOLR

    The protein encoded by this FOLR gene is a member of the folate receptor family. Members of this gene family bind folic acid and its reduced derivatives, and transport 5-methyltetrahydrofolate into cells. This gene product is a secreted protein that either anchors to membranes via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linkage or exists in a soluble form. Mutations in this gene have been associated with neurodegeneration due to cerebral folate transport deficiency.

    10. FUT

    This gene encodes an enzyme belonging to the family of fucosyltransferases. The product of this gene catalyzes the transfer of fucose from GDP-fucose to N-linked type complex glycopeptides. This enzyme is distinct from other fucosyltransferases which catalyze alpha1-2, alpha1-3, and alpha1-4 fucose addition. The expression of this gene may contribute to the malignancy of cancer cells and to their invasive and metastatic capabilities.

    16. MMAB

    The MMAB gene encodes a protein that catalyzes the final step in the conversion of vitamin B(12) into adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), a vitamin B12-containing coenzyme for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. Mutations in the gene are the cause of vitamin B12-dependent methylmalonic aciduria linked to the cblB complementation group. Alternatively spliced transcript variants have been found.

    17. MTHFR

    The protein encoded by this gene catalyzes the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, a co-substrate for homocysteine remethylation to methionine. Genetic variation in this gene influences susceptibility to occlusive vascular disease, neural tube defects, colon cancer and acute leukemia, and mutations in this gene are associated with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency.

    18. MTHFS

    The protein encoded by this gene is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate to 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate, a precursor of reduced folates involved in 1-carbon metabolism. An increased activity of the encoded protein can result in an increased folate turnover rate and folate depletion.

    19. MTR

    This gene encodes the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase. This enzyme, also known as cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase, catalyzes the final step in methionine biosynthesis. Mutations in MTR have been identified as the underlying cause of methylcobalamin deficiency complementation group G.

    20. MTRR

    This gene encodes a member of the ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) family of electron transferases. This protein functions in the synthesis of methionine by regenerating methionine synthase to a functional state. Because methionine synthesis requires methyl-group transfer by a folate donor, activity of the encoded enzyme is important for folate metabolism and cellular methylation. Mutations in this gene can cause homocystinuria-megaloblastic anemia, cbl E type.

    26. SULT

    SULT SNPs in some SULTs are fairly uncommon in the population, but some, most notably for SULT isoform 1A1, are commonly found and have been associated with cancer risk for a variety of tumor sites and also with response to therapeutic agents.

    27. TCN1

    The TCN1 gene encodes a member of the vitamin B12-binding protein family. This family of proteins, alternatively referred to as R binders, is expressed in various tissues and secretions. This protein is a major constituent of secondary granules in neutrophils and facilitates the transport of cobalamin into cells.

    28. TF

    This gene encodes a glycoprotein with an approximate molecular weight of 76.5 kDa. It is thought to have been created as a result of an ancient gene duplication event that led to generation of homologous C and N-terminal domains each of which binds one ion of ferric iron. The function of this protein is to transport iron from the intestine, reticuloendothelial system, and liver parenchymal cells to all proliferating cells in the body. This protein may also have a physiologic role as granulocyte/pollen-binding protein (GPBP) involved in the removal of certain organic matter and allergens from serum

    29. TYMS

    The TYMS gene encodes the enzyme thymidylate synthase, which is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil as used in chemotherapeutic treatment of various cancers. Variations in the the TYMS gene can influence risk for toxicity

    30. VDR

    This gene encodes vitamin D3 receptor, which is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of ligand-inducible transcription factors. This receptor also functions as a receptor for the secondary bile acid, lithocholic acid. Downstream targets of vitamin D3 receptor are principally involved in mineral metabolism, though this receptor regulates a variety of other metabolic pathways, such as those involved in immune response and cancer. Mutations in this gene are associated with type II vitamin D-resistant rickets.

    And more...

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